alan wheatley


[1] In February 1959 he played Edgar Marr in an American thriller, House Without Windows. His television career -- beginning in 1938 -- went along a similar path. This, he used to maximum effect as a tool for impersonating a gallery of suave, urbane - usually rather likeable - villains, rogues and assorted shady types. [1] In December of the same year he played Abanazar in Aladdin, a lavish show at the London Coliseum, with songs by Cole Porter, production and choreography by Robert Helpmann, and co-starring Bob Monkhouse, Ian Wallace and Ronald Shiner.

Prime members enjoy FREE Delivery and exclusive access to music, movies, TV shows, original audio series, and Kindle books. [7] He made English translations of several of them; "Lament on the Death of a Bullfighter" was the first to be completed, and was broadcast by the BBC in 1946. During World War II, Alan's voice was heard regularly as announcer and newsreader for the BBC European Service. [17] His other television roles of the 1950s included Rupert Cadell in  Rope (1953) and the murderous Jonathan Brewster in the comedy Arsenic and Old Lace (1958). 95%.

He generally tended to imbue these characters with a distinct air of smugly superior disdain. Wheatley worked on a variety of projects during … The reviewer in The Stage thought Wheatley displayed "a good voice and presence" in the role but was "rather lightweight". 95% After the end of his tenure as Richard Greene's nemesis, Alan popped up as assorted police inspectors, professional types, legal eagles and men of the cloth, in anything, from Danger Man (1960) to Department S (1969).

95% He generally tended to imbue these characters with a distinct air of smugly superior disdain. On television, he will remain the definitive incarnation of the Sheriff of Nottingham in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1955). Sharp-featured, incisive Surrey-born actor whose chief trademark was a memorably mellifluous voice.

Alan had reinvented himself as an actor after abandoning his first profession as industrial psychologist.

Wheatley worked on a variety of projects during his early entertainment career, including "Caesar and Cleopatra" with Vivien Leigh (1946) and "Brighton Rock" (1951) starring Richard Attenborough. [16], Wheatley died of a heart attack in Westminster, London on 30 August 1991, aged 84.[6][20]. At the end of the year he joined the company at the Mercury Theatre, London, where his roles included the Greek and Tegeus in a double bill of W. B. Yeats's The Resurrection and Christopher Fry's A Phoenix Too Frequent,[11] Julian in Ronald Duncan's This Way to the Tomb (which the cast also played at the Studio Champs-Elysées in Paris and the Garrick Theatre, London), and Harry in T. S. Eliot's The Family Reunion. [5], In September 1939 at the time of the outbreak of the Second World War Wheatley joined the BBC Drama Repertory Company. Wheatley passed away in August 1991 at the age of 84. After the end of his tenure as Richard Greene's nemesis, Alan popped up as assorted police inspectors, professional types, legal eagles and men of the cloth, in anything, from Danger Man (1960) to Department S (1969). He acted in adaptations of plays by writers including Noël Coward and Somerset Maugham, and of novels by Alexandre Dumas, James Hilton, Anthony Powell and C. P. Snow among others.


Alan's sheriff is devious and cunning, a sophisticated arch villain of great clarity, an equal to the hero - if it were not, of course, for the ineptitude of his minions. [8], When BBC television resumed after its suspension during the war, Wheatley played a wide range of characters, from Sam Weller again (1946), to the humorously cynical schoolmaster Rupert Billings in The Happiest Days of Your Life (1949) and the tragic king in Richard II (1950). Barrie, and Oscar Wilde. During World War II, Alan's voice was heard regularly as announcer and newsreader for the BBC European Service. [1] The Times said of him, "His clarity of diction and balanced speaking voice became well known in war-time Europe, where people in occupied countries turned to the BBC for information". While preferring the intimacy offered by provincial theatre he also shone on the grander stage of the Old Vic, and, in 1936, appeared in "St. Helena" on Broadway. The six instalments (all live transmissions) were well-received but did Alan no favour: the resulting publicity led his agent to ask for higher salaries and this, in turn, led to fewer job offers. In the course of the next three decades he impersonated the good (detective Lord Peter Wimsey) and the bad (Othello, Judas, Richard III) with equal verve. [17] He made his final appearance in 1991 in a BBC Radio 4 adaptation of A Day by the Sea, with Wendy Hiller and Michael Hordern, both old friends of his. [13] Wheatley's co-stars were Derek Francis as Dr Watson and Bill Owen as Inspector Lestrade. Would you like Wikipedia to always look as professional and up-to-date?

[9], In 1945 Wheatley rejoined the Old Vic company, touring as Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet.

On the big screen, Alan was best served by being the ill-fated Fred Hale in Brighton Rock (1948); the duplicitous traveller on the Sleeping Car to Trieste (1948); and the corrupt financier Mark Cruden in Delayed Action (1954). That same year, he made his feature film debut in The Conquest of the Air (1936). Alan was the very first 'BBC Sherlock Holmes' in 1951, taking his cue for the role from the drawings of Sidney Paget and the descriptions by Arthur Conan Doyle. [1] In 1949 he played the title role in Hamlet at the Richmond Theatre.

He is a figure, not merely of wonder or of fun, but of romantic possibility". His most prominent television role was the Sheriff of Nottingham in the 1950s TV series The Adventures of Robin Hood, with Richard Greene as Robin Hood; Wheatley played the sheriff in 54 episodes between 1955 and 1959. [9], Wheatley's entry in Who's Who in the Theatre records no stage appearances by him between 1952 and 1959. This, he used to maximum effect as a tool for impersonating a gallery of suave, urbane - usually rather likeable - villains, rogues and assorted shady types. [1] He made his first appearance on the stage at the Festival Theatre, Cambridge in October 1928, as Randall Utterword in Heartbreak House, after which he was a member of the repertory company at that theatre and later in Hull. He was educated at Tiffin School, and was then employed in industrial psychology. In 1930 he toured as Sir Roger Fairfax in Sweet Nell of Old Drury with Fred Terry, and in 1931 in The Quaker Girl. Alan Wheatley was an accomplished actor who led an impressive career, primarily on the big screen. Barrie, and Oscar Wilde. [6] His colleague Peter Cotes said that the part made him into a well known "personality",[13] and although he was regarded by colleagues as "the best high comedy actor in Britain",[15] and "daring", "haunting" and "moving" in various roles,[16] nonetheless, after the Robin Hood series he was, in the words of an obituarist, "more inclined to be cast as a suave villain than as a hero". View the profiles of people named Alan Wheatley. I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like. [9] He played the role "with many a villainous smile", as The Times said, but eventually withdrew from it.

Alan's sheriff is devious and cunning, a sophisticated arch villain of great clarity, an equal to the hero - if it were not, of course, for the ineptitude of his minions. That's it. GRO Register of Deaths; SEP 1991 15; 1514 Westminster.

Alan Wheatley (19 April 1907 – 30 August 1991) was an English actor and former radio announcer.He is perhaps best known for playing the Sheriff of Nottingham in the 1950s TV series The Adventures of Robin Hood, with Richard Greene playing Robin Hood.In 1951, Wheatley had played Sherlock Holmes in the first TV series about the fictional detective, but no recordings of … Alan Wheatley.

In his later years he worked mainly in radio, as a narrator, a verse-reader and an actor. In 1975 he played Judas Iscariot in the 12-part cycle The Man Born to be King by Dorothy L. Sayers. [19], In later years Wheatley worked mostly on radio, as narrator and poetry-reader as well as actor. For the remainder of the decade he made a living as a supporting player (with a penchant for period costume) in works by Shakespeare, John Galsworthy, J.M.
His television career -- beginning in 1938 -- went along a similar path. He was a well known stage actor in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, appeared in forty films between 1931 and 1965 and was a frequent broadcaster on radio from the 1930s to the 1990s, and on television from 1938 to 1964.

All rights reserved. He made his Broadway debut in the same year, in the Old Vic's production of St Helena, playing Las Cases to the Bonaparte of Maurice Evans. He retired from the screen in 1970, and died in August 1991 in London at the age of 84. Apr 19, 1907, Birthplace: While preferring the intimacy offered by provincial theatre he also shone on the grander stage of the Old Vic, and, in 1936, appeared in "St. Helena" on Broadway. For the remainder of the decade he made a living as a supporting player (with a penchant for period costume) in works by Shakespeare, John Galsworthy, J.M. The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. In addition to acting, Wheatley was a radio announcer during the Second World War, broadcasting to occupied Europe, where he became a well known voice. He played Richard D'Oyly Carte in a three-part BBC television series Gilbert and Sullivan: The Immortal Jesters (1961), and appeared in episodes of Maigret (1962 and 1963), Doctor Who and Compact, both in 1964. Later in his career, Wheatley worked on the Steve Railsback action film "Lifeforce" (1985). Alan Wheatley Sharp-featured, incisive Surrey-born actor whose chief trademark was a memorably mellifluous voice. [3] He subsequently toured in Scandinavia and adjoining countries, as Major Petkoff in Arms and the Man and Arnold Champion-Cheney in The Circle. Alan was the very first 'BBC Sherlock Holmes' in 1951, taking his cue for the role from the drawings of Sidney Paget and the descriptions by Arthur Conan Doyle. [14], Between 1955 and 1959 Wheatley is recorded by the British Film Institute as appearing in 54 episodes of the ABC television series The Adventures of Robin Hood as the Sheriff of Nottingham, the perpetual adversary of Robin (Richard Greene).

[17] His last cinema role listed by the British Film Institute was Major Ronald Grey-Simmons in Clash by Night (1965). This led to a constant stream of work as a radio actor and reader of English literature and poetry.

On the big screen, Alan was best served by being the ill-fated Fred Hale in Brighton Rock (1948); the duplicitous traveller on the Sleeping Car to Trieste (1948); and the corrupt financier Mark Cruden in Delayed Action (1954). This, he used to maximum effect as a tool for impersonating a gallery of suave, urbane - usually rather likeable - villains, rogues and assorted shady types. [1] He appeared in several films in the 1930s (see Filmography below), and, already a frequent broadcaster on BBC radio, he made his first television appearance in August 1938, playing Lane in The Importance of Being Earnest. [1], In November 1931 Wheatley performed in London at the Embassy and St Martin's theatres, as the Journalist in Britannia of Billingsgate. From May to September 1940 he was an announcer on the BBC Overseas Service and then until March 1945 he was principal announcer and newsreader for the BBC European Service.

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